Book Review – Nineteen Eightyfour – George Orwell…

In 1984, London is a grim city where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind. Winston is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions. Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party. Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be.

I agreed to buddy read this book with a friend of mine. I have to hang my head in shame and confess to being one of the few people who have never read any of George Orwell’s books. For this reason, and also for the reason that I fight against totalitarian governments and oppression wherever I can. So I began the book with a large dose of enthusiasm.

Sadly, for the first four chapters struck me with crippling boredom. I was finding it very difficult to maintain any interest in the book. I have problems with books. My hands/wrists become very painful after only a short while of reading. So I downloaded the book onto my kobo instead, and wow! The difference has been marked. I’m now captivated by the story.
There is a disturbing aspect to the story when Winston has violent and murderous thoughts about Julia and also the desire to rape her, near to the start of the story. That misogynistic piece of the plot was disturbing and upsetting, but yes, I know that people do think that way and it is saddening.
When Winston and Julia come together, the story shows the lengths that two people in love will go to in order to circumvent their situation and be together.
What this book showed is the way that an oppressive political regime can use fear to control the people and there can be no way out. No hope. This book has painted a picture of lonely people existing in their own bubbles. In joyless lives, terrified to have an independent thought that would lead to the arrival of the thought police.
This dystopian world shows a political party exercising ultimate and total control of its citizens. I don’t want to say more on this vein, as I don’t want to spoil the story.
Orwell has created a grey, colourless world that holds you tightly in its grip and will not let go.
A three out of five star read.

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Book Review – Inspector Hobbes and the Bones (Unhuman #4)

‘I was grateful for having been born human’
There’s going to be trouble. Andy Caplet’s wife goes away, someone is out to get him, and he loses nearly everything in a storm. Amazing both himself and his unhuman friend Inspector Hobbes, he heroically rescues flood victims and uncovers something shocking.

Is Andy being set up for blackmail by the apparently charming young woman who attempts to seduce him, or is something even more sinister afoot? Hobbes certainly believes so, and he’s getting worried.

This is the fourth in Wilkie Martin’s unhuman series of standalone cozy comedy crime fantasies.

I was given an ARC by NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

I had never heard of this writer before. As I am very keen to discover both writers I’ve never come across before and new talent, I was really interested in this book.

The characters are ever so slightly strange at first, especially if this is the first book of the series that you have read. The people in the story are all very eccentric. I was particularly fond of Billy the ninja dwarf. He was great.

It was a little bit hard to wrap my head around the character and place/street names at first. However, the more I realised that that was all a part of the story’s central themes of difference and eccentricity.

The story line was good and there were several plot twists and turns. It was also rather comical in places. All in all, I was pleasantly surprised. An excellent story.

A four out of five star read.

I am profoundly grateful to NetGalley and The Witcherley book company for my copy.

A Plea to Former PETA employees — it’s time to rise up.

mom2nomads

This morning I read a blog piece by Nathan Winograd entitled The (Death) Cult of PETA, it is absolutely required reading for anyone who wants to know more about PETA and I hope it spreads far and wide. In it he perfectly lays out not only the arc of damning evidence that brings into the light what actually happens to companion animals behind PETA’s closed doors, but the mindset that enables these events to happen. Please read it — there is not one wasted word in it and it is a vital piece of research and writing.

While there is a lot to say and highlight about Mr. Winograd’s piece, what I want to focus on for the purposes of this blog are the former employees he has spoken to over the years, because there have been many and they are quoted in his piece. The problem is that none…

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Trump’s #FuckingWall

mom2nomads

It’s only a few days into America’s new administration and I am reeling — which is why I’m unable to sleep, sitting at the computer at 4:30 in the morning drinking day old coffee out of my mug that has a drawing of an owl that looks like it wants to kill you and reads “I will fuck you up. SRSLY.”

I have been watching as executive order after executive order has been signed (hey, Republicans, where’s the outrage now?). We have an executive order that not only brings back the global gag rule but expands it massively, endangering the health of impoverished people all over the world (thanks, Trump). We have an executive order to go ahead with the Keystone pipeline and the Dakota Access pipeline (because, fuck the earth). We have an expected ban on refugees (because give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning…

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Book Review – The Devil’s Prayer by Luke Gracias…

In search of answers, Siobhan travels to the isolated convent where her mother once lived. Here she discovers Denise’s final confession, a book that details a heinous betrayal that left her crippled and mute, and Denise’s subsequent deal with the Devil to take revenge. In the desperate bargain Denise made with the Prince of Darkness, she wagered Siobhan’s soul. 
As Siobhan discovers the fate of her soul, she learns that hidden within the pages of her mother’s confession is part of The Devil’s Prayer, an ancient text with the power to unleash apocalyptic horrors. 
And now her mother’s enemies know Siobhan has it. 
Can Siobhan escape an order of extremist monks determined to get the Prayer back? Can she save the world from its own destruction? 

I was given an ARC by NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
Enough with the loving on this book already. This book started off a little woodenly I’m afraid. It was slow moving, and nothing in the first two chapters grabbed me at all. That continued on through the whole story.
There was, for me, no flow in the text at all. The story was clunky and jerky and every time I thought that it was going to take off and go somewhere, it sputtered to a halt again.
The ending of the story was frustrating and left way more questions than it answered. I wanted to like this book, I really did, but it just didn’t happen. Sorry.
A two out of five star read.
I am profoundly grateful to NatGalley and Australian ebook publisher for my copy.

Book Review – The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr…

“I look at my hands. One of them says ‘Flora, be brave’. I am Flora.”
Flora has anterograde amnesia. She can’t remember anything day-to-day: the joke her friend made, the instructions her parents gave her, how old she is.
Then she kisses someone she shouldn’t have kissed – and the next day she remembers it. The first time she’s remembered anything since she was ten.
But the boy is gone.
Desperate to hold onto the memory, she sets off to the Arctic to find him.
Why can she remember Drake? Could he be the key to everything else she’s forgotten?
I have been given an ARC by NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review…
The book introduces us to 17 year old Flora at a party. She has things written on her arms. That’s how she remembers them. The writer illustrates Flora and her world so cleverly. You are there in the moment with her as she takes her first sip of wine at a party and then as she has her first kiss with the boy who just happens to be her best friend’s ex boyfriend…
This book cleverly details what grief can do to people and what untreated grief can make people do to others. It’s beautifully poignant.
It’s inspiring, it’s beautiful, it gives you hope.
A five out of five star read.
I am profoundly grateful to NetGalley and Penguin for my copy of this book.

Book Review – Good Me, Bad Me by Ali Land…

‘NEW N A M E . NEW F A M I LY. S H I N Y. NEW. ME . ‘ Annie’s mother is a serial killer. The only way she can make it stop is to hand her in to the police. But out of sight is not out of mind. As her mother’s trial looms, the secrets of her past won’t let Annie sleep, even with a new foster family and name – Milly. A fresh start. Now, surely, she can be whoever she wants to be. But Milly’s mother is a serial killer. And blood is thicker than water. Good me, bad me. She is, after all, her mother’s daughter… Translated into over 20 languages, Good Me Bad Me is a tour de force. In its narrator, Milly Barnes, we have a voice to be reckoned with.
I was given my ARC by NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
Wow. Just wow. This is my kind of book, and when a new writer pops up on the scene, I am always keen to absorb the story and see what the new author’s style is like.
Land’s writing style is masterful and full of suspense. I got frustrated two thirds of the way from the simple point that no matter how many pages I turned, I couldn’t get to the end. I was so caught up in the threads of the storyline.
Milly’s character you really do find yourself feeling sorry for. She’s only 15 and already her life has been more than most people can take. She is struggling to come to terms with her life and the actions of her serial killer mother.
The book has only one weak spot as far as I am concerned and that is the way the end is constructed. Other than that, this is a brilliant book! Really well written.
A four out of five star read.
I am profoundly grateful to NetGalley and Penguin UK for my copy.