Best Buy ever… and talk about poo…

Now then. I’m going to talk about something that, if you are chronically ill, can be a huge part of your life. Pooing. Yes…. poo. Lots of people don’t like to talk about it but it is one thing that needs to be talked about.

Taking a poo is something that healthy people don’t think about. It’s a normal, everyday function and you just get on and do it whenever you have to.

However, when your health starts to change and your body becomes affected by chronic illness, that can change dramatically. It can change as a result of your illness or as a result of your medication. If you are especially unlucky it can be as a result of both.

I have severe IBS but my Fibromyalgia also affects my bowel function. I am either hugely constipated or permanently on the toilet because of almost torrential diarrhoea. The other thing that affects me is my medication. As I have a number of illnesses that require strong pain medication, I am even more constipated than I usually get. When I do go, it’s like pooing pebbles. Rock hard and hugely painful.

Then I watched a review of something called the “Squatty Potty” by a lady called Antonella the Uncensored Reviewer. The woman is fabulous but very blunt and NSFW or not safe around young children. She does product reviews of all kinds of stuff, but it was the Squatty Potty that caught my attention due to my issues.

I hunted around to find out a few more facts about how it actually works.

The idea of squatting to poo is nothing remarkably new, and many cultures across the world have public restrooms with squatter instead of toilets. It’s hard to deny that it’s a cleaner way to go as far as sharing a toilet with someone, but there are also several key benefits to squatting vs. sitting that just make sense.

It’s also easy to see that this is the way that our species was designed to relieve ourselves, and that the only reason we stopped going that way is because the use of a sitting toilet became widespread in the west. Aboriginal people all over the world go in this manner, and unless you train a young one to use a sitting toilet their natural inclination will be to squat.

In the squatting position, gravity does most of the work. The weight of the torso presses against the thighs and naturally compresses the colon. Gentle pressure from the diaphragm supplements the force of gravity.

Squatting relaxes the puborectalis muscle, allowing the anorectal angle to straighten and the bowel to empty completely.

Squatting lifts the sigmoid colon to unlock the “kink” at the entrance to the rectum. This kink also helps prevent incontinence, by taking some of the pressure off the puborectalis muscle.

The colon is equipped with an inlet valve (the ileocecal valve) and an outlet valve (the puborectalis muscle). Squatting simultaneously closes the inlet valve, to keep the small intestine clean, and opens the outlet valve, to allow wastes to pass freely. The sitting position defeats the purpose of both valves, making elimination difficult and incomplete, and soiling the small intestine.

Sure, the first time that I mounted the royal throne and sat with my knees up around my ears I felt very bloody odd. I can’t lie either. It did put my lower back in a painful position. But I was willing to suck that up in order to potentially have a proper poo. Which I did!!! Woohoo!!! Yay for me I was so happy!

Do you buy the squatty potty? Shop around on Amazon. I found one that was much cheaper than the original squatty potty and it does exactly the same job. Also, if you go for the squatty potty, you have to do measuring of the toilet. None of that involved with the one that I chose. It was a damn sight cheaper than the squatty potty as well.

Should you think about this? Absolutely! Once you get over the weird way you are sitting, you “go” much more comfortably and no angry thrutching and groaning is needed. A highly recommended product! 10/10!

Be kind to each other!x

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